A designer who writes.


Findings

A library of collectanea.


What I did not know when I was very young was that nothing can take the past away: the past grows gradually around one, like a placenta for dying.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:27am on June 24, 2017

[On Van Gogh] A chair, a bed, a pair of boots. His act of painting them was far nearer than that of any other painter to the carpenter’s or the shoemaker’s act of making them.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:27am on June 24, 2017

The masses, the required anonymous labor force, persist in remaining a population of individuals, despite their living and working conditions, despite their displacement.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:27am on June 24, 2017

A name and two dates, the last one precise to the very day. This is what is recorded. About what happened between, apart from the bare fact of survival, not a word is written.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:26am on June 24, 2017

One’s death is already one’s own. It belongs to nobody else: not even to a killer. This means that it is already part of one’s life.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:25am on June 24, 2017

Yet poetry uses the same words, and more or less the same syntax as, say, the Annual General Report of a multinational corporation. (Corporations that prepare for their profit some of the most terrible battlefields of the modern world.) How then can poetry so transform language that, instead of simply communicating information, it listens and promises and fulfills the role of a god?

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:25am on June 24, 2017

Poems, even when narrative, do not resemble stories. All stories are about battles, of one kind or another, which end in victory and defeat. Everything moves towards the end, when the outcome will be known. Poems, regardless of any outcome, cross the battlefields, tending the wounded, listening to the wild monologues of the triumphant or the fearful. They bring a kind of peace.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:25am on June 24, 2017

Physically his body, simplified by burning to the element of carbon, re-enters the physical process of the world.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:24am on June 24, 2017

The principal function of painting, until recently, was to depict, to make as if continually present, what soon was to be absent.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:24am on June 24, 2017

There is no way of comparing the time of the hare with that of the tortoise except by using an abstraction which has nothing to do with either.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:24am on June 24, 2017

I have always thought that household gods were animals. Sometimes visible and sometimes invisible, but always present.

And Our Faces, My Heart, Brief As Photos: John Berger: Bloomsbury Paperbacks 11:23am on June 24, 2017

For many children the act of being read to—and therefore the book itself—is powerfully associated with being loved.

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:23am on June 24, 2017

Once upon a time we chose none of our reading: it all came to us unbidden, unanticipated, unknown, and from the hand of someone who loved us.

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:23am on June 24, 2017

No critic will ever amount to much who does not start with strong personal preferences and end by transcending them so that he can see the good in works which are not really his ‘dish.’

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:22am on June 24, 2017

For an adult reader, the possible verdicts are five: I can see this is good and I like it; I can see this is good but I don’t like it; I can see this is good, and, though at present I don’t like it, I believe with perseverance I shall come to like it; I can see that this is trash but I like it; I can see that this is trash and I don’t like it.

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:22am on June 24, 2017

Local libraries “are often peopled with … students who can’t find a quiet place at home to work.… Denying these children the space and silence to study and contemplate the past that the better-off may be able to find in a spare room of their house is nothing short of social discrimination at its worst.” Leslie fears a return to a time “when only the elite could afford silence.”

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:22am on June 24, 2017

If we devote ourselves exclusively to modern literature—we get to think the world is progressing when it is only repeating itself.

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:19am on June 24, 2017

I relied on my gift for mimicking authority figures and playing back to them their own ideas as though they were conclusions I’d reached myself. … What was learning but a form of borrowing? And what was intelligence but borrowing slyly?

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:19am on June 24, 2017

Young people often signal through their pretensions what they hope to become: they have discerned, maybe in a limited way, some good and they are pursuing it as best they can, given limited knowledge and experience.

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:19am on June 24, 2017