A designer who writes.


Findings

A library of collectanea.


If we devote ourselves exclusively to modern literature—we get to think the world is progressing when it is only repeating itself.

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:19am on June 24, 2017

I relied on my gift for mimicking authority figures and playing back to them their own ideas as though they were conclusions I’d reached myself. … What was learning but a form of borrowing? And what was intelligence but borrowing slyly?

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:19am on June 24, 2017

Young people often signal through their pretensions what they hope to become: they have discerned, maybe in a limited way, some good and they are pursuing it as best they can, given limited knowledge and experience.

The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction – Alan Jacobs – Oxford University Press 11:19am on June 24, 2017

Publicity turns consumption into a substitute for democracy. The choice of what one eats (or wears or drives) takes the place of significant political choice. Publicity helps to mask and compensate for all that is undemocratic within society.

Ways of Seeing by John Berger 11:17am on June 24, 2017

The purpose of publicity is to make the spectator marginally dissatisfied with his present way of life. Not with the way of life of society, but with his own within it.

Ways of Seeing by John Berger 11:17am on June 24, 2017

The exotic and nostalgic attraction of the Mediterranean.

Ways of Seeing by John Berger 11:17am on June 24, 2017

Hack work is not the result of either clumsiness or provincialism; it is the result of the market making more insistent demands than the art.

Ways of Seeing by John Berger 11:16am on June 24, 2017

You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, you put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting Vanity, thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for your own pleasure.

Ways of Seeing by John Berger 11:16am on June 24, 2017

The conventions called those appearances reality. Perspective makes the single eye the centre of the visible world.

Ways of Seeing by John Berger 11:16am on June 24, 2017

The past is never there waiting to be discovered, to be recognized for exactly what it is. History always constitutes the relation between a present and its past.

Ways of Seeing by John Berger 11:16am on June 24, 2017

Going to sleep, I cross my hands on my chest.
They will place my hands like this.
It will look as though I am flying into myself.

Short poems from Bill Knott’s I Am Flying Into Myself 9:36am on June 24, 2017

Intelligence that’s not modulated and moderated by creativity, common sense and wisdom is not such a positive thing to have. What it leads to is people who are very good at advancing themselves, often at other people’s expense.

Is the U.S. Education System Producing a Society of “Smart Fools”? – Scientific American 7:46pm on June 18, 2017

“Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation.”

You see this on many electronic devices sold in the United States, and I think it’s actually a pleasingly crisp formulation of the “golden rule” in terms that make more explicit that such a rule mandates that you accept things from others that you yourself should not or are not allowed to do.

Mills Baker’s answer to What’s the most unusual source for the elements of your moral worldview? – Quora 10:21pm on June 7, 2017

Obliviousness is privilege’s form of deprivation. When you don’t hear others, you don’t imagine them, they become unreal, and you are left in the wasteland of a world with only yourself in it, and that surely makes you starving, though you know not for what, if you have ceased to imagine others exist in any true deep way that matters.

Rebecca Solnit: The Loneliness of Donald Trump | Literary Hub 1:03pm on June 5, 2017

Live, [pop music] can provide the kind of indelible, empowering experience that was so beautifully described by the American rock critic Ann Powers on social media in the aftermath of the Manchester attack: “Telling your mom it’s OK and you’ll meet her right after the show, running toward the front hand in hand with your best friend like you don’t even have a mom right now, flirting with the kid who sells you a soda, dancing experimentally, looking at the woman onstage and thinking maybe one day you’ll be sexy and confident like her, realising that right this moment you are sexy and confident like her, matching your voice to the sound, loving the sound, falling into the sound.”

Manchester’s heartbreak: ‘I never grasped what big pop gigs were for until I saw one through my daughter’s eyes’ | UK news | The Guardian 9:48pm on May 24, 2017

“Late capitalism” often seems more like “the latest in capitalism”

Why the Phrase ‘Late Capitalism’ Is Suddenly Everywhere – The Atlantic 1:26pm on May 11, 2017

A government no longer steers towards its chosen destination. The word “horizon”, with its promise of a hoped-for future, has vanished from political discourse – on both right and left. All that remains for debate is how to measure what is there. Opinion polls replace direction and replace desire.

Meanwhile by John Berger 1:10pm on April 26, 2017

The word we, when printed or pronounced on screens, has become suspect, for it’s continually used by those with power in the demagogic claim that they are also speaking for those who are denied power. Let’s talk of ourselves as they.

Meanwhile by John Berger 12:53pm on April 26, 2017

One of the most consoling aspects of animals is that their priorities have nothing whatsoever to do with our own perilous and tortured agendas. They are redemptively unconcerned with everything we are and want.

The Wisdom of Animals | The Book of Life 12:42pm on April 24, 2017